The keys to a good impact position is a forward leaning shaft and 90% weight on the left leg. Beginning golfers fall back with their weight onto the right foot trying to scoop the ball into the air. This results in all sorts of bad shots.

Once the pivot moves back away from the target the only way to hit the ball is by bending your wrist forward and adding loft to the golf club. The stack and tilt method is a great solution to this all common problem.

The stack and tilt method was introduced on tour in 2005 by Mike Bennet and Andy Plummer and now have 20 players, including Aaron Baddeley, Mike Weir, Will MacKenzie and Eric Axley. I do not suggest the stack and tilt is the holy grail of swing mechanics although if used by a beginning golfer as a means to an end can assure rapid development.

The biggest contribution to the golfing community came when conventional wisdom was challenged and the ball flight laws were rewritten. The complete confidence and understanding of why the golf ball behaves was the impetus to creating the stack and tilt.

inil01_stackandtilt_basicsBy pre-setting most of your weight on the left leg from address it forces you into a better impact position. Take a fairly narrow stance and play the ball just back of center. Focus on hitting the ground in the same spot for every swing making sure to hold the finish with all your weight on the left foot.

Get over the fear of hitting the ground or damaging the grass.

Every time I tell a beginner to hit the ground and take big divots they instantly start hitting good shots. Again, the key to a good impact is 90% weight on left leg with a forward leaning shaft. The stack and tilt setup position should help you achieve this result.

Understand the numbers and go even deeper with the Stack & Tilt 2.0 Dvd set.

Take your most lofted club in your bag and practice hitting shots as low as you can. At first it may help to slowly build up to a full swing. Your goal is to hit the ball as far as you can but with a very low trajectory. Judge your performance on whether or not you took a divot and strive to constantly lower the trajectory.

 

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